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Rules Quiz!

What sound signals should be given in the following situations?

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INT'L RULES

The red boat, in a narrow channel, wants to overtake the blue boat on its port side.

Rule 34 comes into play. The key to the answer is "narrow channel". Under the International Rules if you wish to overtake a vessel on its Port side, the overtaking vessel shall sound two prolonged blasts followed by two short blasts.This means "I intend to overtake you on your port side."

INLAND RULES

The blue boat wants to overtake the red boat on its starboard side.

Inland Rule 34 requires that an overtaking vessel sound one short blast when overtaking to starboard and two short blasts when overtaking to port.

In the scene, one short blast means "I intend to overtake you on your starboard side"

Restricted Visibility

A sailing vessel in restricted visibility shall sound.

During times of restricted visibility Rule 35 requires sailing vessels, vessels not under command, vessels constrained by draft, fishing vessels, and vessels towing or pushing ahead to sound one prolonged blast followed by two short blasts every 2 minutes.

Can you identify the "Stand-on" vessel in the following situations?

In the following scenarios, according to the Rules of the Road, which vessel is the "Stand-on" vessel and why?

Rule 12 states:

When two sailing vessels each have the wind on a different side, the vessel which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.

Rule 14 states:

When two power driven vessels are meeting on reciprocal or nearly reciprocal courses so as to involve risk of collision each sall alter her course to starboard so that each shall pass on the port side of the other.

Rule 12 states:

When two sailing vessels each have the wind on the same side, the vessel which is to windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.


Vessel "B" is the stand-on because it is on a starboard tack.


Neither boat is the stand-on since they are in a head on situation.


Vessel "B" is the stand-on because it is leeward of vessel "A".

 

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